University of Oregon

School of Architecture and Allied Arts

Study in A&AA

Undecided About Your Major?

Exploring new subjects, building your skills, and examining new ideas are some of the special opportunities you have at the University of Oregon. Study with us and experience the wide range of disciplines that compose the UO’s School of Architecture and Allied Arts. The school offers dozens of degrees in nationally ranked, accredited programs with expertise in sustainable cities, healthy communities, cultural arts, art and architectural history, design, public and nonprofit sector management, and green product design. Take time to explore new areas before you choose a major or minor. Join us today!

Student Services Hub in A&AA (PODS = Professional Outreach and Development for Students)

277 Lawrence Hall | 1190 Franklin Blvd. | 541-346-2621 | pods@uoregon.edu | pods.uoregon.edu

We offer a student services hub for all A&AA majors and minors assisting with general academic advising. Other UO students interested in the school’s academic programs can receive general information about majors and minors from the PODS office. The hub also offers scholarship information and provides extensive career services. Students can meet for individual advising or attend the many workshops, classes, and events designed to support timely graduation, enhance professional skills, cultivate career connections, and develop clear job and internship search strategies. The PODS office is committed to support each student's academic and career goals.

Learn about:

  • A&AA majors and minors
  • Professional development classes and workshops offered every term
  • On-time graduation
  • Portfolio requirements
  • Application deadlines
  • Career paths

Apply to the Major

Several of the academic programs in A&AA have rolling admissions and welcome students each term, while others require students to apply to the program. Visit the department or program's website for more information: http://aaa.uoregon.edu/programs

 

General Education and Open Elective Courses for Majors and Nonmajors

Take group-satisfying courses
Earn multi-cultural credits
Explore electives open to nonmajors

A&L = Group-satisfying course, arts and letters
SSC = Group-satisfying course, social sciences
AC = Multicultural course, American cultures
IP = Multicultural course, identity, pluralism, and tolerance
IC = Multicultural course, international cultures

Architecture and Allied Arts

AAA 199. Special Studies: Design, Create, Change. (4 credits) A first-year-only course that teaches creativity and design-thinking to manifest responses to racism and injustice. The Common Reading book Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates will be central to the content of discussions and projects.

AAA 321. Inclusive Urbanism: Design, Create, Change. (4 credits) A junior-level course focusing on the intersection of social justice and design.

AAA 408/508. Workshops: Basic Design Portfolio, Creative Design Careers, Job and Internship Search, Entrepreneurship, and Individual Brand Strategies (1-2 credits) Multiple workshops by the A&AA career services hub (PODS) to help students examine careers, job search skills, and exploring creative design careers. Online. Multiple instructors.

Architecture

ARCH 201. Introduction to Architecture. (4 credits) Offers a structure of principles for making places for people. Examines places, design procedures, and the use of architectural principles in general. Current UO students interested in applying to the major should take this course fall term and contact the department’s advising staff for more information.

 

Art

Visit the class schedule and explore special topics courses (numbered 199) in watercolor, garden paper, children’s books, printmaking, and more. These introductory courses are open to majors and non-majors.

ART 101. Understanding Contemporary Media. (4 credits) Critical exploration of concepts surrounding and defining the experience of understanding contemporary art. Students are guided by instructors through issues relating to their work and disciplines. A&L

ART 115. Surface, Space, and Time. (4 credits) Introduces interdisciplinary media processes, critical theory, formal communication design, color theory, skills in objective evaluation and critique, and how materials, processes, and context establish meaning.

ART 116. Core Interdisciplinary Laboratory. (4 credits) Rigorous studio projects in the core studio sequence stressing interdisciplinary media transitions and the interrelatedness of conceptual and formal concerns. Prerequisite: ART 115.

ART 233. Drawing I. (4 credits) Introduction to basic drawing concepts and practices.

 

Art and Technology

ARTD 250. Print Media Digital Arts. (4 credits) Examines application of print media in contemporary visual culture; explores its use in a fine art context. Introduces digital drawing, digital photo editing, and typographic layout to visually communicate expressive concepts.

ARTD 251. Time-Based Digital Arts. (4 credits) Explores the notion of time as a medium in relation to contemporary art through which concepts of sequence, narration, scoring, and motion are expressed.

 

Arts and Administration

AAD 250. Art and Human Values. (4 credits) Addresses fundamental aesthetic theory and practice questions resulting from viewing art as a powerful communicator of social and cultural values. Values, rights, and responsibilities of the contemporary visual environment. Multiple instructors. A&L, IP

AAD 251. The Arts and Visual Literacy. (4 credits) Explores ways in which physical, perceptual, affective, and cognitive modes of learning interact when viewing, interpreting, and assessing designed visual information within sociocultural contexts. Multiple instructors. A&L, IP

AAD 252. Art and Gender. (4 credits) Addresses sociocultural factors influencing roles of women and men in arts disciplines. Examines underlying social structures that affect how we define art and artists. Multiple instructors. A&L, IP

AAD 312. Arts Management. (4 credits) Introduces the field of professional management of arts organizations such as museums, galleries, community arts centers, and performing arts centers. A&L

 

Historic Preservation

AAAP 410. Experimental Course: Fundamentals of Historic Preservation. (3 credits) Current topics of American building construction, American architecture from a preservation perspective. Carter.

AAAP 410. Experimental Course: Field Recording Methods. (3 credits) Current topics of American building construction, American architecture from a preservation perspective. Sardell.

AAAP 415. Transportation and Preservation. (3 credits) Learn about Oregon’s, and the nation’s, transportation history, networks, and roadside influence and the connection between preservation and transportation. Gain a comfort and fluency with these two Federal laws: Section 106 and Section 4(f)—a high demand expertise that can lead to good jobs. Bell.

 

History of Art and Architecture

ARH 204. History of Western Art I. (4 credits) Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the ancient cultures producing them. Hurwit. A&L

ARH 210. Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture. (4 credits) Broad survey of modern and contemporary Asian art, architecture, and film. Lin. A&L, IC

ARH 315. History of World Architecture II. (4 credits) Survey of architectural developments in world history. Eggener. A&L

ARH 343. Northern Renaissance Art. (4 credits) Painting and graphic arts of the Netherlands, Germany, and France in the 15th and 16th centuries. Van Eyck, Durer, Holbein, and other leading artists. Harper. A&L

ARH 359. History of Photography. (4 credits) Photography from the early 19th-century to the present, aesthetics of the medium, its relationship to painting and the graphic arts, and its social role. Amstutz. A&L

ARH 387. Chinese Buddhist Art. (4 credits) Introduction to selective aspects of the history of Buddhist art in China. Emphasis on sculpture and painting. Lachman. A&L, IC

 

Interior Architecture

IARC 204. Understanding Contemporary Interiors. (4 credits) Introduction to the theory of interior architecture. Design criteria explored through illustrated lectures and projects involving analysis of space. Ahn. Current UO students interested in applying to the major should take this course fall term.

 

Landscape Architecture

LA 260. Understand Landscapes. (4 credits) Perception, description, and explanation of landscapes as environmental sets, as biophysical processes, and as cultural values. Lovinger. A&L

LA 326. Plants: Fall. (4 credits) Characteristics, identification, and design uses of deciduous trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers. Emphasis on identification and appropriate use in landscape design. Duhrkoop-Galas.

LA 333. Photography and Environmental Values. (4 credits) Explores major movements in landscape photography through the lens of cultural perceptions and policies about landscape and environment. Godfrey. A&L

LA 337. Nature of Eugene. (4 credits) Direct examination and appraisal of the function, form, and content, and composition of example landscapes in relation to ecological, cultural, legal, technical, aesthetic, and economic objectives. Lueck.

LA 390. Urban Farm. (4 credits) Experimentation with food production in the city; rebuilding urban soils; farm animal-plant relationships; nutrient cycles. Cooperative food production and distribution; use of appropriate technologies. Keeler.

 

Planning, Public Policy and Management

PPPM 201. Introduction to Public Policy. (4 credits) Overview of professional public service and the planning and management of public issues. Focuses on the goals of public services within their economic, social, and political contexts. Clark. SSC

PPPM 325. Community Leadership and Change. (4 credits) Explores sustainable change at the community level by examining local systems and institutions: transportation, social influences, environment, housing, and the economy. Weinman.

PPPM 331. Environmental Management. (4 credits) Introduction to environmental management. Focuses on solutions to problems in managing population, pollution, and resources. Holtgrieve. Online only.

PPPM 399. Power Writing. (4 credits) Learn about the underlying logic of effective communication, with focuses on the transition from personal writing and descriptive narrative to persuasive professional writing for a range of audiences. Jaworski.

 

Product Design

PD 101. Introduction to Product Design. (4 credits) Examines how designers invent things that help people through interviews with design superstars, drawing techniques, photo documentation, computer-aided design, and design portfolio creation. W. Arndt. Current UO students interested in applying to the major are encouraged to take this course fall term.

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Architecture and Allied Arts

AAA 425. Reflective Practice: Design, Create, Change. (2 credits) Students use research to develop a professional vision statement, portfolio, and synthesis paper that reflects on their academic, internship, practicum, or field experiences. This course provides critical context for students’ final terms of study and identifies possibilities for future professional trajectories. Dellabough. Course pending UO Senate approval.

 

Art

Visit the class schedule and explore special topics courses (numbered 199) for a variety of introductory courses in art studio practices that are open to majors and nonmajors.

ART 111. The Artist Experience. (4 credits) Critical exploration of concepts surrounding and defining contemporary art through the examination of the individual studio practice of members of the art faculty. Warren. A&L

ART 115. Surface, Space, and Time. (4 credits) Introduces interdisciplinary media processes, critical theory, formal communication design, color theory, skills in objective evaluation and critique, and how materials, processes, and context establish meaning.

ART 116. Core Interdisciplinary Laboratory. (4 credits) Rigorous studio projects in the core studio sequence stressing interdisciplinary media transitions and the interrelatedness of conceptual and formal concerns. Prerequisite: ART 115.

ART 233. Drawing I. (4 credits) Introduction to basic drawing concepts and practices. Various instructors and multiple CRNs.

 

Art and Technology

ARTD 251. Time-Based Digital Arts. (4 credits) Explores the notion of time as a medium in relation to contemporary art through which concepts of sequence, narration, scoring, and motion are expressed.

ARTD 252. Interactive Digital Arts. (4 credits) Introduces resources that the computer offers the artist. Concentrates on animation, interaction, and the web as expressive mediums.

 

Arts and Administration

AAD 250. Art and Human Values. (4 credits) Addresses fundamental aesthetic theory and practice questions resulting from viewing art as a powerful communicator of social and cultural values. Values, rights, and responsibilities of the contemporary visual environment. A&L, IP

AAD 251. The Arts and Visual Literacy. (4 credits) Explores ways in which physical, perceptual, affective, and cognitive modes of learning interact when viewing, interpreting, and assessing designed visual information within sociocultural contexts. A&L, IP

AAD 252. Art and Gender. (4 credits) Addresses sociocultural factors influencing roles of women and men in arts disciplines. Examines underlying social structures that affect how we define art and artists. A&L, IP

AAD 301. Understanding Arts and Creative Sectors. (4 credits) Explore cultural, political, economic, and technological facets of creative activity in social contexts, and examine how these factors inform the ways in which arts administrators serve communities through arts-based programming. A&L

 

Historic Preservation

AAAP 445. Preservation Economics. (3 credits) Economics of historic preservation and the financial techniques and incentives used to rehabilitate historic properties in the United States, including adaptive reuse and redevelopment economics. Buckley.

AAAP 451. Historic Survey and Inventory Methods. (3 credits) Examines how historic inventories help communities plan for wise use of historic resources. Includes complete reconnaissance and survey documentation for historic properties and development of historic context statement. Focus will be on Albany, Oregon as part of Sustainable Cities Year Program. Carter.

 

History of Art and Architecture

ARH 205. History of Western Art II. (4 credits) Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the medieval to early Renaissance cultures producing them. Harper. A&L

ARH 209. Arts of Japan. (4 credits) Historical survey of the visual arts of Japan. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced. Walley. A&L, IC

ARH 314. History of World Architecture I. (4 credits) Survey of global architectural developments from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Hutterer. A&L

ARH 322. The Art of Ancient Greece. (4 credits) History of art in Greece and the Aegean from the Bronze Age, through the Archaic and Classical periods, to the end of the Hellenistic period. Seaman. A&L

ARH 326. The Acropolis of Athens. (4 credits) History, and mythology of the Athenian Acropolis from the Neolithic and Bronze Ages to the Roman period, with special emphasis on the monuments of the Periclean “Golden Age.” Hurwit.

ARH 354. Art Since 1945. (4 credits) Introductory survey of art in the West since World War II. Mondloch. A&L

ARH 399. Special Studies: Cities in the Western Imagination. (4 credits) An introduction to some of the forms, functions, and meanings of cities—mainly European and American—from ancient to modern times. Emphasis will be placed on cities as fields for imaginative activity on the part of those who have designed, built, used, and interpreted them. Eggener.

 

Landscape Architecture

LA 327. Plants: Winter. (4 credits) Characteristics, identification, and design uses of ornamental conifers and broad-leaved evergreen trees, shrubs, and ground covers. Prereq: LA 326.

LA 337. Living Landscapes. (4 credits) Direct examination and appraisal of the function, form, content, and composition of example landscapes in relation to ecological, cultural, legal, technical, aesthetic, and economic objectives.

LA 390. Urban Farm. (4 credits) Experimentation with food production in the city; rebuilding urban soils; farm animal-plant relationships; nutrient cycles. Cooperative food production and distribution; use of appropriate technologies.

 

Planning, Public Policy and Management

PPPM 201. Introduction to Public Policy. (4 credits) Overview of professional public service and the planning and management of public issues. Focuses on the goals of public services within their economic, social, and political contexts. Choquette. SSC

PPPM 202. Healthy Communities. (4 credits) Historical relationships of public policy, planning, and public health; how public policies can promote health; relationship of planning and policies to inequalities in health outcomes. Ngo. SSC

PPPM 205. Introduction to City Planning. (4 credits) Introduces students to the discipline of planning. Covers a range of subdisciplines, including physical and land use planning, urban design, public health, housing, community development, and social planning. Farrington. SSC

PPPM 280. Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector. (4 credits) Overview of the nonprofit sector includes its origin, growth, oversight, and varied elements. Examines theory and research into the effectiveness of nonprofit strategies and structures. Mason. SSC

PPPM 331. Environmental Management. (4 credits) Introduction to environmental management. Focuses on solutions to problems in managing population, pollution, and resources. Online course. Holtgrieve.

PPPM 340. Climate-Change Policy. (4 credits) Overview of climate change policy; topics include cap and trade, carbon tax, fuel efficiency standards, biofuel standards, and renewable portfolio standards. Rosenberg. SSC

PPPM 399. Special Studies: Thinking Sustainably. (4 credits) This course will provide theory and practice in “sustainable thinking”—how to understand and achieve optimal economic, social, and environmental outcomes by thinking, planning, and making decisions from a systemic sustainability perspective. Doppelt.

PPPM 407/507. Seminar: Financial Management for the Arts. (4 credits) Overview of financial management issues and tools for arts organizations. Topics include basic accounting, conventions, ongoing and special project and event budgeting, capital project budgeting, cost and strategic pricing concepts, endowment stewardship, financial reporting and analysis, and internal control systems. Irvin.

 

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Architecture and Allied Arts

AAA 399. Special Studies: Design, Create, Change Studio. (4 credits) A studio-based course centered on current topics of sustainability and social responsibility. Focuses on water pollution.
 

Art

Visit the class schedule and explore special topics courses (numbered 199). These introductory courses are open to majors and nonmajors..

ART 101. Understanding Contemporary Media. (4 credits) Critical exploration of concepts surrounding and defining the experience of understanding contemporary art. A&L

ART 115. Surface, Space, and Time. (4 credits) Introduces interdisciplinary media processes, critical theory, formal communications design, color theory, skills in objective evaluation and critique, and how materials, processes, and context establish meaning.

ART 116. Core Interdisciplinary Laboratory. (4 credits) Rigorous studio projects in the core studio sequence stressing interdisciplinary media transitions and the interrelatedness of conceptual and formal concerns. (Prereq: Art 115) Various instructors. Multiple CRNs.

ART 233. Drawing I. (4 credits) Introduction to basic drawing concepts and practices. Various instructors and multiple CRNs.

 

Art and Technology

ARTD 250. Print Media Digital Arts. (4 credits) Examines application of print media in contemporary visual culture; explores its use in a fine art context. Introduces digital drawing, digital photo editing, and typographic layout to visually communicate expressive concepts.

ARTD 252. Interactive Digital Arts. (4 credits) Introduces resources that the computer offers the artist. Concentrates on animation, interaction, and the web as expressive mediums.

 

Arts and Administration

AAD 250. Art and Human Values. (4 credits) Addresses fundamental aesthetic theory and practice questions resulting from viewing art as a powerful communicator of social and cultural values. Values, rights, and responsibilities of the contemporary visual environment. A&L, IP

AAD 251. The Arts and Visual Literacy. (4 credits) Explores ways in which physical, perceptual, affective, and cognitive modes of learning interact when viewing, interpreting, and assessing designed visual information within sociocultural contexts. A&L, IP

AAD 252. Art and Gender. (4 credits) Addresses sociocultural factors influencing roles of women and men in arts disciplines. Examines underlying social structures that affect how we define art and artists. A&L, IP

AAD 315. Funding the Arts. (4 credits) Introduces the marketing and fundraising management functions in arts organizations like museums, galleries, community arts centers, and performing arts organizations. A&L

 

Historic Preservation

AAAP 410. Sense of Place: Oregon. (3 credits) Designed to help students understanding the physical landscape in Oregon and build a skill set around discerning the forms, functions, and patterns in Oregon’s built environment. Field trips, guest lecturers, class discussion. Bell.

 

History of Art and Architecture

ARH 101. Masterpieces of World Art. (4 credits) Introduction to art and architectural history through examination of thirteen key sites from around the world. Themes include religion, politics, domesticity, and modernity. Harper. A&L, IC

ARH 206. History of Western Art III. (4 credits) Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the Renaissance to modern cultures producing them. Amstutz. A&L

ARH 208. Arts of China. (4 credits) Historical survey of the visual arts of China. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced. Lachman. A&L, IC

ARH 351. 19th Century Art. (4 credits) Broad survey of art made during the “long nineteenth century” in Europe, the United States, and Latin America. Amstutz. A&L

ARH 353. Modern Art, 1880-1950. (4 credits) Modern art from postimpressionism to abstract expressionism in relation to intellectual and historical developments. Cheng. A&L

ARH 358. History of Design. (4 credits) Introduces students to the history of industrial design that spans from the royal manufactories of 17th-century Europe to the age of mass production. Lin. A&L

ARH 399. Special Studies: History of Manga. (4 credits) Survey of the history of Manga (Japanese comics) from the 19th Century to the present. Walley.

ARH 399. Special Studies: Gothic Architecture. (4 credits) Examines both religious and secular architecture from soaring cathedrals to civic palaces looking at Gothic building through structural, constructional, religious, social, artistic, and economic lenses. Hutterer.

 

Landscape Architecture

LA 199. Design for a Sustainable World. (4 credits) This class is a case-based exploration of sustainable design addressing the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and economic issues at the heart of implementing sustainable projects around the globe. It will look at real world examples of how sustainable design can create a prosperous and healthy future for both humanity and the planet. Russel.

LA 235. Drawing the Landscape. (4 credits) Explores the diverse ways we use drawing to represent and understand the landscape. Our local landscapes will serve as the classroom for drawing and creative looking.  These landscapes will include natural, preserved, urban, and human influenced.  Our subject matter will range from dynamic native habitats, to contemporary and historic urban spaces, to human events in place. All of these types of places are either on campus or within short walking distance from the UO. Godfrey.

LA 328. Plants: Spring. (4 credits) Characteristics, identification, and design uses of flowering trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers; emphasis on synthesis of fall, winter, and spring. Prereq: LA 327.

LA 390. Urban Farm. (4 credits) Experimentation with food production in the city; rebuilding urban soils; farm animal-plan relationships; nutrient cycles. Cooperative food production and distribution; use of appropriate technologies.

 

Planning, Public Policy and Management

PPPM 201. Introduction to Public Policy. (4 credits) Overview of professional public service and the planning and management of public issues. Focuses on the goals of public services within their economic, social, and political contexts. Eddins. SSC

PPPM 205. Introduction to City Planning. (4 credits) Introduction to planning, using urban issues as lenses to explore transportation, housing, environment, and social equity as critical elements shaping where and how people live. Schlossberg. SSC

PPPM 327. Global Leadership and Change. (4 credits) Explores the role of leadership in global social, economic, and ecological sustainability. Considers population, consumption, technology, diversity, scale, nonviolent change, and community. Stephens.

PPPM 331. Environmental Management. (4 credits) Introduction to environmental management. Focuses on solutions to problems in managing population, pollution, and resources. Online course. Holtgrieve.

PPPM 407/507. Seminar: International Sustainability. (4 credits) Students will examine global dimensions of sustainability. Discussion centers around the meaning and issues associated with sustainable development and possible policy solutions on an international scale. Ngo.

 

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Many of the school's faculty members offer undergraduate courses as part of the Freshman Interest Group (FIG) offerings. We encourage students to explore our disciplines and to select courses that may fulfill general education requirements.

Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) in A&AA

As a freshman, take advantage of the FIGs to dive into our disciplines. Learn more at IntroDUCKtion. Sign up early.

Urban Garden. A look at urban agriculture in the context of both the designed and natural environment using the campus urban farm as a living laboratory. Led by Harper Keeler. Courses include:

  • LA 260 Understanding Landscapes
  • GEOG 141 The Natural Environment
  • LA 199 College Connections

Visualize a Better World. Explore the tools for making art in contemporary times and matching those with messages which explain human situation and how we can see it more clearly. Led by David Turner. Courses include:

  • AAD 250 Art and Human Values
  • J 201 Media and Society
  • AAD 199 Special Studies: College Connections

Portable Life Museum. Examine your own creative, investigative ways of preserving or experiencing objects that represent the portability of your own life. Develop personal Portable Life Museum “cabinets of curiosity” as tools to understand issues of art, culture, and identity in your own life through guided creative and research processes. Led by Julie Voelker-Morris. Courses include:

  • AAD 252 Art and Gender
  • FLR 250 Introduction to Folklore
  • AAD 199 College Connections

For more information about FIGs, visit fyp.uoregon.edu